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Did You Know ...

... that CT can help bring art forgeries to light?

An art collector purchased a statue of the Virgin Mary, which allegedly dated back to the 13th century. An examination was conducted using a ZEISS computer tomograph. The joints between its different parts revealed that the wooden statue was in fact produced more recently. Definitive proof was delivered by a C14 analysis, which involved permanently removing a chip from the statue.

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Did You Know…

Newsletter

"Did you know that ..." is a newsletter which gives you a fascinating insight into the world of ZEISS: from the analysis of classical works of art to Oscar-winning lenses; from pull-out telescopes to examinations using "ultralight".

Contact

Dagmar Ringel

Press and Public Relations
Carl Zeiss AG

Phone: +49 7364 20-3407

Newsletter Archive

Did you know…

... that CT can help bring art forgeries to light?

An art collector purchased a statue of the Virgin Mary, which allegedly dated back to the 13th century. An examination was conducted using a ZEISS computer tomograph. The joints between its different parts revealed that the wooden statue was in fact produced more recently. Definitive proof was delivered by a C14 analysis, which involved permanently removing a chip from the statue.

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... that leading-edge technology is being repaired in the rain forest?

Doctors Without Borders is using 120 ZEISS Primo Star iLED microscopes to diagnose tuberculosis, malaria and sleeping sickness worldwide. In a service framework agreement, ZEISS has agreed to make the repair handbook available for employees working on-site and is supplying replacement parts quickly and at a favorable price.

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... that new animal species are being discovered in the Atlantic Ocean?

Off the coast of the Azores, Kirsten and Joachim Jakobsen, a German husband and wife team, dive more than a kilometer below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean in their LULA 1000 submarine. Using a faucet-like mechanism, they take samples from the seawater and analyze them using a ZEISS Primovert routine microscope. But the Jakobsens aren't just interested in new one-celled organisms: they're also discovering new species amongst larger animals like fish and jellyfish.

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... that spending too much time looking at your smartphone can severely strain your neck?

27 kilograms is the equivalent of an average eight-year-old – and the weight placed onto your spine when you bend your head forward by about 60 degrees. This stressful position when looking on a mobile device leads to musculoskeletal problems as well as headaches and migraines. ZEISS Digital Lenses can help reduce eyestrain ...

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... that there's a zoo for microorganisms?

In many cities the zoo is a popular destination for both tourists and locals, no matter where you are in the world. But up until now you only found animals in a zoo and plants in a botanical garden. However, an import group of creatures was missing: microorganisms. You can't see microorganisms with the naked eye, which is why you haven't seen them at your local zoo – until now.

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... why van Gogh's Sunflowers shine?

Australian researchers are now using a system normally used for biological samples to examine paint pigments. Using a ZEISS Sigma VP field emission microscope featuring a microtome with a diamond blade, they produce serial sectional images of paint samples.
A three-dimensional image can then be generated, which enables the scientists to map the layers of paint and to better understand the aging process.

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... that 2015 is the Year of Light?

As 2015 marks the anniversary of several major events in optics, the UNESCO General Conference has declared it the International Year of Light. Through a range of events, ZEISS is also is bringing the meaning of light closer to the general public.

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... that bacteria protect the Colosseum?

Bacteria and other microorganisms protect the Roman amphitheater from environmental influences by producing a natural, organic film called patina. For the project »Invincible«, samples were taken from the outer layer of the patina and placed under a ZEISS microscope ...

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... that blue light can be dangerous, yet it's also essential for good health?

Blue light at a wavelength of 460 nanometres can damage the macula, the part of the retina which has the most photoreceptor cells. At wavelengths longer than 460 nanometres, it plays an important role in regulating our melatonin levels, which influence our circadian rhythms and general well-being ...

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... that Catherine the Great had a collection of hairpins with moving parts which were manufactured in China from wires just 30 microns thick?

They include the wings of butterflies and birds and the head of a Phoenix. Restorers examine the hairpins using special microscopes from ZEISS to get a clearer idea of how the moving elements work.

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... that researchers are working towards producing a map of the human brain?

To create the detailed images needed for this map, new methods and tools have to be developed. For example, the current ZEISS MultiSEM 505 uses 61 parallel beams to examine samples in the cubic millimeter or centimeter range. Such volumes previously took years to record and were therefore beyond the limits of the technologically feasible. 

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... that ZEISS camera lenses are turning 125 years old?

On 21 March 1890, the first batch of camera lenses left production in Jena. The successors of the ZEISS camera lenses initially produced 125 years ago are used by millions of people around the world today.

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... that ZEISS products are orbiting a comet?

The Rosetta mission to the Churyumov–Gerasimenko comet is highly successful thanks to the satisfactory landing of the Philae minilab and the measurement data sent to Earth from the mother probe and the lander. The instruments on board Rosetta include two spectrometer systems featuring ZEISS gratings.

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... what opera stars are like offstage?

Cecilia Bartoli and Rolando Villazón in the country, the supermarket or the launderette: these moments were captured by Hollywood photographer Douglas Kirkland exclusively for the 2015 ZEISS Art Calendar.

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Photo: NitroCephal / istockphoto.com

Photo: NitroCephal / istockphoto.com

... what Jurassic Park has to do with reality?

Only the fact that scientists do indeed carry out research on insects fossilized in amber. A newly discovered species was called after the naturalist and broadcaster Sir David Attenborough.

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Photo: iStockphoto.com / Moncherie

Photo: iStockphoto.com / Moncherie

... that ZEISS helps people optimize their smiles?

The Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials draws on modern microscope technology from ZEISS in the development of a new procedure to examine the frictional effects of toothpastes.

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... how the State Hermitage restores archaeological objects?

Mounted on an adjustable arm, the microscopes provide the restorers with ideal magnification in order to remove dirt or coats of paint from old and sensitive surfaces.

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Photo: ARCHITECTEUR / Shutterstock

Photo: ARCHITECTEUR / Shutterstock

... that captains practice navigating in a planetarium?

During power or systems failures, they have to switch from GPS-supported to classical navigation with the help of the stars and a sextant. Many marine and maritime colleges use ZEISS projectors and planetariums for their respective training programs.

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Photo: Richard Prince

Photo: Richard Prince

... how car parts for motor sports are measured?

USA-based supplier Pratt & Miller Engineering inspects wheel suspensions for the Corvette Racing and Cadillac Racing teams with the help of a bridge-type measuring machine from ZEISS. This system allows the company to guarantee maximum precision in the range of just a few micrometers.

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Photo: Frank Lagorio

Photo: Frank Lagorio

… that binoculars wrote literary history?

Ernest Hemingway won the Nobel Prize in Literature exactly 60 years ago. As a hunter and war reporter, he owned several pairs of ZEISS binoculars, which he mentioned in his works, including his famous novel "For Whom the Bell Tolls."

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… … how the Vatican Museums examine works of art?

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… that sharks are successful outside movie theaters too?

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… that eyeglasses can influence works of art?

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...how robots learn to walk?

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... that there are artists taking pictures with microscopes?

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…how the meteorite in Russia was identified?

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…that we can determine what fossil animals ate by analyzing their teeth?


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…that love thrives on fantasy?


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…that a pair of ZEISS binoculars is orbiting the Earth?

 

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…that stars are made by hand at ZEISS?

 

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…that in many cases, blindness is preventable?


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…that 50 micrometers can make a crucial difference on the way to the summit?


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…that an alleged murder by poisoning has been cleared up after some 400 years?


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…that non-linear effects affect the resolution limit?


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…that German optics have been playing a special role in Mexico for 100 years?


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…that movies can be viewed in 3D even at the recording stage?


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…that a modern eyeglass lens also takes your nose into account?


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…that technology keeps you healthy?


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…why ZEISS is interested in how fast grass grows?

 

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…that there is such thing as a grain-sized microscope?


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…how neurosurgeons can see blood flow in the brain?


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…why tinted eyeglass lenses are usually brown, gray, or green?


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…that microscopes are on a world tour?


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…that light has a dual nature?


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…that microscopes can save our world heritage?


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…that the creaminess of chocolate can be measured?


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…that Archaeopteryx wore a little black dress?


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…that science and pleasure are not mutually exclusive?


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…that you can fly at CeBIT – using a pair of glasses?


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…that ZEISS supports young researchers?

 

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…that microscopes can reveal a battery’s age?


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…that ZEISS has been revolutionizing vision for 100 years?

 

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…that ZEISS works with angels and Oscar winners?

 

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…that liquid can make images sharper?


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…that gecko feet stick better than any glue?


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…that you can use microscopes lying down?


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…how baby bottles stay leak-proof?


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…that you can paint with microscopes?


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…that navigation systems can be used for brain surgery?


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…that ZEISS holds an open house in Jena on 1 October? This is how the company will be celebrating 20 years of reunification.

 

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…that fig wasps and fig trees have been inseparable for 34 million years?


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…that a new microscope makes the practically invisible visible?


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…that volcanoes spew glass?


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…that ZEISS lights up the stars in the world’s largest planetariums?

 

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…that molecules can make changing your glasses a thing of the past?


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…that you have to wait until 2018 to see the very first stars?


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…that ZEISS inspires the researchers of tomorrow?

 

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…what all you can learn in Jena?

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…which objective lenses are ready for the Oscars?


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…that we move closer to something when we cannot see it clearly?


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…that NASA films its space shuttle launches using high-performance cameras?


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…that ski goggles will get you to the bottom more safely?


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…that “ultralight” can be used for examinations?


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…that ZEISS is keeping an eye on the Himalayas?

 

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…how the vision of Asian children is being improved?


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…where the Land of Ideas is?


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…how you can treat myopia most quickly?


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…how zebra finches learn to sing?


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…that ZEISS honors Nobel Prize winners?

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…how best to call attention to promising young soccer players?


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…that 3D movies do not need a screen?


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…what’s inside a solar cell?


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…that the art world has a new genre?


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…when microscopes take center stage?


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…that ZEISS can harvest energy?

 

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…that 2,000 inventors work at ZEISS?

 

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…that school is going green?


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…what sunglass lens type you are?


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…that ZEISS makes atoms visible?

 

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…that the world’s first planetarium was erected on the roof of the ZEISS Factory?

 

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…that ZEISS is an advocate for young women in technical professions?

 

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…that the fire department uses virtual fires to practice for emergencies?


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…that ZEISS supports more than 70 countries in detecting tuberculosis?

 

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…that Bochum has one of the most modern planetariums in Germany?


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… that up to 21 people can look through a microscope at the same time?


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…that ZEISS helped discover Pluto?

 

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…that ZEISS is committed to the protection of birds?

 

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…what makes German biathletes so successful?


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…that your photos taken with ZEISS lenses can win awards?

 

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…that ZEISS has a solution for super resolution?

 

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…that ZEISS awards prizes?

 

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…that ZEISS is sailing around the world?

 

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…that the search for oil and natural gas just got easier?


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…that there were once two separate companies known as ZEISS?

 

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…that ZEISS helps out at harvest time?

 

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…how ZEISS is helping in the fight against cataracts?

 

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…that glass can be more expensive than gold?


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…that ZEISS contributes to air safety?

 

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…that ZEISS is a starcatcher?

 

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…that ZEISS unravels mysteries?

 

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…what all light can do?


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…that ZEISS makes clever glasses?

 

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…that ZEISS can tell the difference between a real Van Gogh and a forgery?

 

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…that ZEISS is a regular at the patent office?

 

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…that ZEISS helps affected countries detect tuberculosis faster?

 

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…that ZEISS puts the classroom online?

 

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…that you can win an Oscar with ZEISS?

 

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…that ZEISS has a new hobby for you?

 

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…that you can win a Nobel Prize with ZEISS?

 

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…that Wim Wenders placed Berlin in a calendar?


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…that microscopes from ZEISS are used in the restoration of church
windows?

 

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…that star photographer Uwe Ommer traveled with ZEISS for four years?

 

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…that cameras with ZEISS lenses went to the moon before going to Hollywood?

 

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…that you can drive a car with ZEISS?

 

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…that ZEISS applies for two patents every day?

 

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…that ZEISS helps you heal faster?

 

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…that ZEISS is involved in the fabrication of microchips?

 

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…that ZEISS can measure the human eye with an accuracy of one hundredth of a diopter?

 

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…thanks to ZEISS, you do not have to be so afraid of the dentist?

 

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…that ZEISS makes it possible to read the newspaper?

 

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…that ZEISS made the world’s smallest soccer field?

 

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…that ZEISS is helping to save rare mountain gorillas?

 

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…that ZEISS has developed a movie theater to go?

 

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…that you can meet ZEISS at Girls’ Day?

 

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…that you can land on the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet with ZEISS?

 

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…that you can find ZEISS in the movie theater?

 

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…that you can meet ZEISS in a biathlon?

 

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