The ZEISS Archives

The ZEISS Archives contain original documents, files, photos, patents, registered designs, product literature, technical documentation and instruments from more than 150 years of company history.

The Archives were established in 1948. This is where the rest of the written documentation was collected, documentation that survived WWII, the American confiscations and the Soviet dismantling of German industry. Initially part of the Archives of VEB Carl Zeiss Jena, they then became the central archives of the VEB Carl Zeiss Jena conglomerate. After German reunification in 1989/90, they became part of Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH. Today, they are the ZEISS global archives.

Our Services

Eigene Recherche für Forschungs- und Publikationsvorhaben im Archiv © ZEISS Archiv
Eigene Recherche für Forschungs- und Publikationsvorhaben im Archiv © ZEISS Archiv
Eigene Recherche für Forschungs- und Publikationsvorhaben im Archiv © ZEISS Archiv
  • Inquiries related to instruments, people and events
  • Reproduction of photographs on the history of Carl Zeiss
  • Copies of advertising material, user manuals and other documents
  • Loan of old instruments to museums and exhibitions
  • Independent research for research and publication project in the Archives

Contact Details & Arrival

The Archives are open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Other visiting times can be arranged.

Before your initial visit, please make an appointment:

Phone: +49 3641 64 2759
Email: his tory @zeiss .com

Go to Registration Form

The Archives are located at the Jena site.

ZEISS Archives

Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10
07745 Jena

Directions
Aufbau des Archivs © ZEISS Archiv

Structure of the Archives

The ZEISS Archives were originally created for inventory. They were allocated the documents from before 1945, those of the VEB and some of those belonging to the combine. This unit (BACZ) therefore houses the documents up to the mid-1960s.

Only in 1998 was a decision made to merge the individual combine operations as individual holdings. As the documents of the BACZ are already used and cited in scientific literature under this signature, and there is no compelling reason to realign them, it was decided that the documents of the VEB would stay as is and perform major division only at catalogue level.

VEB Carl Zeiss Jena

Against the embittered resistance of the workforce, Carl Zeiss Jena was nationalized on 1 July 1948. At the same time, VVB Optik was established with a view to coordinating the work of the VEBs in the field of optics. In the first few years, the foreman of VEB Carl Zeiss Jena was also top executive of this VVB. ZEISS was soon adapted to the needs of the state-controlled economy. This organizational structure did not see any major changes over the next few years. Only the Employment Directorate was set up in 1953.

Major changes were commonplace at Research and Development. This affected the intermediate levels more than it did the individual Research and Development departments.

However, the documents on this level can be allocated to the individual laboratories. For this reason, precise reconstruction of these organizational changes is not important for document indexing.

VEB Carl Zeiss Jena Combine

On 1 January 1965, VEB Carl Zeiss Jena was turned into a combine. At the same time, it was allocated to VEB Rathenower Optische Werke (ROW).

Organizational change was rather a slow process. While the former management team did become independent enterprises (telescope management (FBL) became the F enterprise), officially they remained production facilities. The core areas (Research, Development, Technology, Sales) remained dominant. It took a while for them to become fully integrated enterprises.

As these enterprises hardly left any trail behind them, and in order to make the structures less complex, the few documents (45 units, primarily from the G, F and P enterprises) were allocated to the former management and a new stock was only formed with the establishment of a new, fully integrated enterprise. The same process was applied to the documents from Research and Development (see also the Research Operations section). They were allocated to the former laboratories until the establishment of the Research Center in 1971.

Plant for optical precision instrument construction (G-plant)

Since the mid 1960s, substantial investments were approved for ZEISS. The aim of the investments was to increase the production of scientific precision instruments for the needs of the former East Germany and for exports.

One of the greatest construction projects was that of building 6/70. It became the center of the South Production System (aka Factory II), which saw a large part of the South Factory consolidated into a technological system. The three parent companies G, F and P relocated to building 6/70 once the investments were complete and were consolidated in "Factory 2". Effective 7 December 1971, the project management team in charge of building 6/70 since 20 March 1971, also known as the "building team", was dissolved. As of 6 December 1971, the plant management of Factory 2, which was renamed G enterprise, assumed its duties. Also effective 6 December 1971, the F, G and P enterprises were allocated to plant management for Factory II. The responsibilities of the specialist management teams was consistent across all the enterprises of the combine. It was conducted horizontally, by responsibilities.

After conclusion of the reforms, the organizational strcuture of Factory 2, or the G enterprise, remained intact until the dissolution of the G enterpise. The Security department was renamed GX in 1977 and the inspection office assigned to it, which had previously been directly below the plant manager. An order management team (GA) was formed and assumed the construction management tasks of the GT department.

Research Center (W-plant)

After the combine was formed in 1965, an initial attempt was made to expand the enterprises into full-fledged companies. For this reason, Research and Development were allocated to the individual enterprises. A central directorate for Research and Development was retained, which was primarily in charge of initial and basic research. 

The internal organizational structure of the laboratories and development offices had hardly any impact on the new setup. The laboratories retained their names and roles, even if the structural acronyms changed. The laboratories remained in the research block constructed in 1959. This means that only minor adjustments were made to the informal processes as well. This continuity is evident in the documents: they were simply continued. Their allocation to the enterprises only lasted a short while. After a detailed analysis of these documents, it came to light that the document structure did not permit any sort of major change. What's more, this would result in increased complexity. For this reason, the documentation remained allocated to the origin classification of the VEB's old research institutes. This led to a skewed structure: while the VEB's other documents only go back as far as 1964, the documents for research
and development up to 1970 have been allocated to the VEB. This did not change until the Research Center was established on 1 January 1971. Here, not only were Research and Development merged, but also Technology Development for the "Technology" Management team. 

After a number of experiments at the organization, in 1976 a structure was created that essentially remained intact throughout the life of the Research Center. Meanwhile, the experiments concerned the laboratories and development offices than they did the levels between them and the Research Management team. The laboratories were thus split into two groups for a time: WL and WS. 

In 1968, a dedicated Research Center was established for the automation of the AUTEVO technical preparation. The Research Control Center LZ AUTEVO was funded by the state budget and tasked with driving research in computer-assisted production preparation in international collaboration and with the other branches of industry. Funding resources were provided, which were utilized in mechanical engineering, systems construction, and the electronics and building industries. In 1979, the Research Center, which had by now been reduced to the AUTEVO coordination point, was closed. The topics and some of the staff initially moved to the X department, then to WEH, and later on to WEK.

Your Research in the ZEISS Archives

(only available in German)

Before visiting the archives, you can research pictures, printed matter and files (so far only Kombinat Carl Zeiss Jena) via our online search tool. You will also find a database with descriptions of the devices manufactured by ZEISS.

Photo Gallery

In the last few years, over 160,000 photographs have been catalogued. Of these, more than 120,000 have already been scanned. The oldest pictures date back to the 1860s. The images show people, buildings, instruments, and events. Due to the enormous amount of data and for data privacy reasons, it is not possible to upload the photos themselves to the internet.

We will be happy to provide you with printable versions of our photos to be used for editorial or scientific purposes.

Our terms of use are as follows:

  • "ZEISS Archives" must be named as the source.
  • The images may only be used for the intended purpose. After use, the image files and any copies must be destroyed.
  • Any use for a different purpose must be approved in advance. Any unauthorized transfer to third parties is prohibited.
  • A specimen copy of the pictures will be sent to the ZEISS Archives before they are published in any way.

Using preview images, you can select which pictures you would like to order from his tory @zeiss .com. Please tell us what you intend to use the images for and provide us with the signature above each image.

 

Product Literature

Over 100,000 different product literature publications are catalogued in the product literature database. Almost without exception, they consist of product literature from Carl Zeiss and its subsidiaries. Among them are catalogs, brochures, and instruction manuals, as well as price lists and circulars for retailers. You can also find reprints of scientific articles discussing Carl Zeiss instruments.

The collection of product literature up until 1945 is almost complete; only some of the brochures for military instruments are missing. For the period after 1945, the publications of VEB Carl Zeiss Jena and that of the combine have been collected.

The gaps include: military instruments as well as instruments which were ultimately not produced in Jena, especially glasses (Rathenow), binoculars (Eisfeld) and camera lenses (Saalfeld).

ZEISS in Oberkochen has thus far collected the product literature for the Microscopy business group and the former Geodetic Instrument business group, which has since been taken over by the company Trimble Jena GmbH.

For cost reasons, these documents can be searched but not downloaded. However, you can order copies. We charge €0.50 per page (plus a €5 fee) with a minimum order value of €15.

Files

In conjunction with Prof. Walter, who holds the Chair for Economic History at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, and with sponsorship from the VW Foundation, three important collections from the VEB Carl Zeiss Jena combine were made accessible between 1998 and 2002.

The goal was to test new indexing forms for the internet.  

In the next few years, the plan is to make other inventories from the combine as well as older inventories available one by one for research and release them for use on the internet.

Online research can be done to prepare for, but not replace, a visit to the archives, since the file contents themselves cannot be uploaded to the internet. To order files from the archives, you need the digital signature of each file.

For data privacy reasons, access to the index of persons is limited.

We are currently working on a way to help locate the older Carl Zeiss files from before 1945.

Virtual Museum

In our Virtual Museum, you can find every instrument manufactured by Carl Zeiss up to 1945. The devices have the original texts from the old brochures.

Online research in the Virtual Museum

Exact manufacturing dates are often difficult to ascertain, which is why we have decided not to offer specific information.

The following ranges can be researched online (1945–1990):

 

Jena

Oberkochen

Astronomical Devices

Glasses

Documentation Technique

 

Binoculars

Magnetic Tape Storage

 

Medical Technology

Analysis Metrology

Microelectronics

 

Microscopy

Numerics

 

Photo

Projection and Movie Theater

 

High Vacuum Technology

 

Surveying instruments

Instrument Collection and Museum

A collection of roughly 1,500 Carl Zeiss instruments is on display in Jena. The items are lent out for company presentations to museums and to exhibition organizers.

This collection builds on the collection from the former plant for optical precision instruments (G-Plant) at Carl Zeiss (German Democratic Republic). It has grown in the past few years.

The aim is to collect these instruments, which document the product history and scientific development of Carl Zeiss in Jena.

This is what distinguishes our collection from that of the optical museum in Jena and Oberkochen:

The Optical Museum in Jena is based on a collection from the Carl Zeiss Research departments in Jena. Today the two organizations are no longer directly linked. The Optical Museum documents the history of optics. The focus is largely, but not exclusively, on Carl Zeiss.

The ZEISS Museum of Optics in Oberkochen collects instruments from the ZEISS Group up through German reunification, as well as the latest products.

Optical Museum

Online research for microscopes and employees until 1890

Evaluation of the places of residence of employees until 1890 (© ZEISS Archives).

With the help of our History Maps you can search online for employees or sold microscopes:

Short biographies are available for all employees who were hired until 1889. You can search by name, place of origin or profession. The places of birth are shown on a map. The mechanics from this early period come from all over Germany and some of them stay only for a short time. The opticians, on the other hand, who were initially trained by Carl Zeiss itself, came from the region and usually stayed until the end of their professional lives.

Search for employees until 1890

Another map illustrates where the microscopes were sent until 1889. Zeiss initially delivered more to German and Russian university towns, but later he also achieved great growth in the western european science and trade metropolises.

Research for microscopes until 1890

 

Projects

Chronicle of Optics
In the early 1950s, archivist Fritz Ortlepp put together a chronicle of optics. It consists of some 30,000 index cards and ranges from the pre-Socratic philosophers to about 1945. This card catalogue is currently being processed so that it can be made available as an online database.

The next step planned is to complete the data from World War II on.

Virtual Museum
The biographies of the 100 most important Carl Zeiss employees up to 1945, including photos, are currently being compiled. They are being added to the Virtual Museum along with a photo. There will be links to the instruments that each person invented.

The patent database for the period before 1945 will also be included in the museum. The patents are to be linked to the inventors and products.

The products of VEB Carl Zeiss Jena and the Carl Zeiss Group following 1945 are to be catalogued. However, due to the diversity of companies and business units, this will take some time to complete. Parts of the Virtual Museum will be translated into English. Due to the volume of data involved, however, this will take some time.

If you are interested in taking part in one of the projects on a voluntary basis, please send an email to: wolfgang .wimmer @zeiss .com

Aufbau des Archivs © ZEISS Archiv

Research Tips

Like on the internet, "full-text searches" are possible. However, it often turns up very imprecise results. For this reason, there are three further ways of searching that are typical for archives:

Indizes © ZEISS Archiv, Photo: Anna Schroll

Indices
Keyword, device and place indexes enable precise searches for particular information. In general, the individual keyword is followed by a derivative and a comma in order to keep the number of hits at a reasonable level

Therefore, it is advisable to also consider related terms in the index lists (keywords, devices, etc.).

Example:

The full text search for "Geschäftsbericht" returns more than 270 hits.

In the keyword index you will find:
Geschäftsbericht, 1933/34
Geschäftsbericht, 1935
[...]

For reasons of data protection, the personal index cannot be activated on the Internet.

Document Plan
Since the mid-1970s, the document plan of the Ministry for Electronics and Electrical Engineering has been used.

This file plan has its disadvantages. The content was arranged by topic and formal aspects (e.g. protocols). The origin is not important.

For instance, as per the document plan, "Workloads of the Different Management Levels" had to be filed under number 0.2.3. The content was formally catalogued on the level below that (Specifications, Designs, Protocols, Templates). There was no way to distinguish between the "different management levels" such as combine and enterprise management. They can therefore not be distinguished here.

That's why this document plan is not suitable for all archive searches. However, as the documents were pre-classified in this way, this system remained in use.

Classification
A completely new classification was created based on origin. An attempt was made to use the document origins as a guide to the greatest possible extent. In other words, the documents are allocated to the organizational units in which they were created and/or the department that was responsible for a particular question.

Consistent division was not always meaningful, which is why, for example, the plant management documents, which could in theory be responsible for all questions and problems, are allocated to the respective directorates and departments.

There are 4 hierarchy levels: at the top is the inventory, and below it are the main departments and directorates, followed by the other departments. Large document volumes are allocated by tasks and responsibilities on the lowest level.

Web Research into Production and Supply Lists until 1920

Digital scans on Collections@UrMEL

The written records of Carl Zeiss Jena contain production and dispatch lists for microscopes and optical measuring instruments. In collaboration with the Thuringian State and University Library in Jena, digital scans of these books  were published online to enable independent research. This means instrument specifications, production details and information about the recipient can now be researched online. The lists were compiled with old German handwriting, which means they are sometimes confusing and thus hard to work with. If you have any questions, please contact us.

Production lists for microscopes

Microscope production lists (production data) and dispatch lists (e.g. buyers, equipment) were combined until 1904. From this date onwards, only delivery data was collected. The lists are normally structured as follows:

Serial number / stand + recipient / place of delivery / accessories / date of delivery / produced by + date

In book 1, simple and compound microscopes appear in separate lists. Simple microscopes were given their own numbers, from 1 to 879, and compound microscopes from 1 to 5,024. From 1,865 to 1,881, the microscope stands featured two labels: stand no. / microscope no. So, for example, the 500th compound microscope is also the 1,174th ZEISS microscope. So it was labeled as “500/1,174.” The dissecting microscopes were labeled from 1 to 86, but in reverse order (microscope no./ stand no.).

In books 2 through 7, the microscopes are listed in numerical order, from 5,000 to 69,460. This does not apply to the dissecting microscopes, which are logged in book 3, and numbered from 10,003 to 51,260.

Development of stand types until World War I
Microscopes are the oldest product group at ZEISS. The first simple microscope was sold in 1847, and from 1852 onward Carl Zeiss began to incorporate new design features (the fixed stage and movable lens holder) into his microscopes. The first compound microscope was produced in 1857. In the early years, Zeiss produced eight different stands (O, I, Ib, II, IIIb, IIIc, IV, V). The Roman numerals are used to indicate different stand sizes, rather than chronological order. It was possible to select different combinations of lens systems (A, B, C) and eyepieces (1, 2, 3, 4). In 1879, Ernst Abbe (scheduled production of microscope optics based on optical laws) and Otto Schott (melting of new optical glass) triggered a boost in microscope development. In 1886, the company celebrated the production of the 10,000th Zeiss microscope. In 1903/04, August Köhler developed UV microscopy. And in 1906, Henry Siedentopf and Richard Zsigmondy built the slit ultra-microscope, which ultimately earned Zsigmondy the Nobel Prize in 1925.

 

Nr. 1 – 4999, Mikro 1 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7710)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

1

 

Einfache Mikroskope

UrMEL

564/815

879/4974

Einfache Mikroskope

UrMEL

1/1477

491/4999

Neues Präpariermikroskop

UrMEL

1

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

239/796

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

500/1174

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

1000/1806

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

1500/2434

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

2000/3005

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

2500/3467

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

3000/4136

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

3500/4722

3749/4987

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

Nr. 5000 – 9999, Mikro 2 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7711)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

3750/5000

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

5500

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

6000

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

6500

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

7000

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

7508

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

8000

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

8500

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

9000

 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

9513

9665 

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

5035

9914

Neues Präpariermikroskop

UrMEL

880/5009 

8557 

Einfache Mikroskope

UrMEL

9666 

9999

Zusammengesetzte Mikroskope

UrMEL

Nr. 10003 – 51260, Mikro 3 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7712), Präpariermikroskope

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

10003

14321 

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

15009 

15971

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

13263 

13310

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

15972

19920

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

20013

24950

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

25011

29999

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

30000

34930

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

35051

39910

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

40071

44999

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

45000

49930

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

50031

51260

Präpariermikroskope

UrMEL

Nr. 10000 – 24000, Mikro 4 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7713)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

10000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

11000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

12000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

13000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

14000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

15000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

16000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

17000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

18000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

19000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

20000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

21000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

22000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

23000

24000

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

Nr. 24001 – 45660, Mikro 5 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7714)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

24001

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

25000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

26000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

27000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

28000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

29000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

30000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

31000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

32005

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

33000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

34000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

35000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

36000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

37000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

38000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

39000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

40000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

41000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

42000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

43000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

44000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

45001

45660

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

Nr. 45661 – 57960, Mikro 6 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7715)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

45661

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

46000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

47000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

48000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

49000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

50000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

51000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

52000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

53000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

54000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

55000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

56000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

57000

57960

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

Nr. 57961 - 69460, Mikro 7 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7716)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

57961

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

58000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

59000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

60000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

61000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

62000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

63000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

64000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

65000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

66000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

67000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

68000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

69000

69460

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

Nr. 69461 - 74800, Mikro 8 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7717)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

69461

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

70000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

71000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

72000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

73000

 

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

74000

74800

Mikroskop-Stative

UrMEL

68000

74800

einzelne Nummern

UrMEL

Production lists for optical measuring instruments

Any ZEISS instruments that used optical methods to determine chemical or physical characteristics were referred to as measuring instruments. This area also paved the way for the creation of other product groups like geodetic instruments, stereoscopy and photogrammetry. That’s why instruments like these were also included in these production lists. The first measuring instruments were collected in the book “Mikro 1” (Micro 1). From 1888 and refractometer no. 91 onward, individual lists were also compiled for these instruments.

The instrument type should first be identified before research can be conducted into the production lists. You can also contact us.

 

In addition to microscopes, a number of other instruments were taken to market before 1890 but only in small numbers. In 1890, Dr. Carl Pulfrich began setting up the Optical Measuring Instruments field of the business. It was based on Ernst Abbe’s instrument designs: Abbe’s thickness gages, comparators, focimeters, spherometers, dilatometers, spectrometers, refractometers (quantitative analyses of refraction and color dispersion of solid bodies, liquids and gases), spectroscopes, and spectrographs for IR and UV light. In 1893, Pulfrich took Abbe’s refractometer to market (quality inspection for butter, cooking fats, oils). This was followed by the launch of the Pulfrich refractometer (for chemists) in 1895. Other product creations included butter refractometers and milk fat refractometers (Pulfrich and Wollny). In 1899, Pulfrich developed the immersion refractometer for chemical and clinical laboratories; the photometer (Pulfrich) and interference measuring instrument (Pulfrich) came later. From 1899 onward, instruments for measuring length, refractometers, spectrometers, technical inferometers and colorimeters were advanced by Dr. Fritz Löwe.

bis Nr. 527, Mikro 1 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7710)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

1

527

Refraktometer

UrMEL

100

114

Prozentrefraktometer

UrMEL

1

77

Butterrefraktometer [gestrichen]

UrMEL

30

 

Luftpumpe

UrMEL

Nr. 91 – 2800, Mess 1 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7741)

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

 

 

Instandsetzungen 1918

UrMEL

91

210

Refraktometer n. Abbe

UrMEL

1

150

Butterrefraktometer / Milchfettrefraktometer

UrMEL

216

235

Refraktometer n. Abbe

UrMEL

1/100

14/113

Prozentrefraktometer

UrMEL

1

10

Milchfettrefraktometer

UrMEL

1

210

Stereo Mikrometer

UrMEL

1

499

Messgeräte

UrMEL

500

999

Messgeräte

UrMEL

1000

1499

Messgeräte

UrMEL

1500

1999

Messgeräte

UrMEL

2000

2280

Messgeräte

UrMEL

41

90

Augenabstandsmesser

UrMEL

1

5

Maaßstäbe

UrMEL

201

202

Entfernungsmesser

UrMEL

1

10

Entfernungsmesser

UrMEL

1

60

Handspektroskope m. Vergleichsprisma

UrMEL

31

41

Analysator auf Stativ

UrMEL

1

30

Analysator auf Stativ

UrMEL

2281

2340

Messgeräte

UrMEL

61/2341

89/2370 

Handspektroskope m. Wellenlängenskalen

UrMEL

1

15

Augenweitenmesser (Pupillometer)

UrMEL

11

24

Entfernungsmesser 8fach

UrMEL

1

61

Absorptionsgefässe zum Vergleichsmikroskop

UrMEL

1

330

Heizspiralen

UrMEL

25

64

Entfernungsmesser 8fach

UrMEL

1/2371

30/2400

Stereoskope

UrMEL

1/2401

30/2430

Stereoskope (Neukonstruktion)

UrMEL

62

93

Absorptionsgefässe zum Vergleichsmikroskop

UrMEL

1

32

Wandtafel zur Erläuterung des Butterrefraktometers

UrMEL


23

Fresnel'sche Biprismen

UrMEL

31/2431

342/2742

Stereoskope (Neukonstruktion)

UrMEL

1/2743

60

Quecksilberbogen

UrMEL

343/2773

400/2800 

Stereoskope (Neues Modell)

UrMEL

Nr. 2801 – 14030, Mess 2 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7742), lückenhaft

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

2801

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

3000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

4000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

5000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

6000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

7000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

8000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

9000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

10000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

11000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

12000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

13000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

14000

14030

Messgeräte

UrMEL

Nr. 14031 - 22029, Mess 3 (ZEISS Archiv, BACZ 7743), lückenhaft

von Nr.

bis Nr.

Gerätetyp

Fertigungsliste

14031

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

15000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

16000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

17000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

18000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

19000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

20000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

21000

 

Messgeräte

UrMEL

22000

22029

Messgeräte

UrMEL

© ZEISS Archiv
Research in the Virtual Museum This is where you will find information about instruments manufactured by ZEISS up to 1945, and in some cases 1990. (only available in German)

List of literature

A selection of publications about ZEISS

Felix Auerbach: The Zeiss Works and the Carl Zeiss foundation in Jena. Their scientific, technical and sociological development and importance popularly described. 5th Edition
W. & G. Foyle, Ltd. London, 1925.

Stephan Paetrow: Birds of a Feather. 20 Years of Reunification at Carl Zeiss
Hanseatischer Merkur, 2011.

Stephan Paetrow und Wolfgang Wimmer: Carl Zeiss 1816-1888. A Biography
Böhlau, 2016.

Kerstin Gerth: Ernst Abbe 1840–1905. Scientist, Entrepreneur, Social Reformer,
Bussert & Stadeler, Jena, 2005.

Stephan Paetrow: Better Vision. Carl Zeiss Eyeglass Lenses 1912 – 2012
Hanseatischer Merkur, 2012.

William Firebrace: Star Theatre. The Story of the Planetarium
Reation Books, 2017.

Matthias Georgi und Tobias Mahl: 90 Years of Industrial Metrology at Carl Zeiss
August Dreesbach Verlag, München, 2010.

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