Part 2: How ZEISS software supports doctors

In Part 1 of our special issue about digitization we presented two software sites of ZEISS Medical Technology. Our colleagues in Munich, the Indian city of Bangalore, Jena and Dublin, California develop and test software used in ZEISS medical systems. We will present a few examples here.

Software supports doctors during operations that could make all the difference between life and death for their patients. This is shown by the story of Tabitha Williams.

In the minimally invasive correction of defective vision the laser is controlled by software, as our colleague Li Ning from China reports. ZEISS software is used in eye doctors‘ practices and hospitals when the devices need to be networked with each other, and software also supports dentists in their training and talks with patients.

Going to the dentist's: a surgical microscope and stucco on the ceiling

Going to the dentist's: a surgical microscope and stucco on the ceiling

   

Learn more about the practice of Dr. Hoffmann from Germany and about the benefits of a surgical microscope in dentistry!

Tricky Game of Skill

Test your knowledge and skills in removing caries thoroughly and sew the wound in the gum , enter your name in our List of the Best and measure your skills against other players! Good luck!

Let’s start – play and win!

A diabetic retinopathy screening solution – starting in India

more
The Smiths visit their eye doctor

The Smiths visit their eye doctor

more
Life-saving light in the OR

Life-saving light
in the OR

more
A personal success story of a refractive treatment

A personal success story of a refractive treatment

more

Remote diagnostics for millions

A diabetic retinopathy screening solution – starting in India

Diabetic retinopathy is a disease that affects millions of people all over the world. If it is left untreated, it can lead to blindness. And in emerging countries in particular, its treatment ias always a matter of cost. In remote regions the people affected can now put their trust in telemedicine, for which ZEISS has now developed a solution. The innovative concept that leverages digital technology for screening and management of diabetic retinopathy in India received the internal Innovation Award in June 2015.

Our colleague, Prashant Desai from Bangalore, shares some insights about this project.

You have just been presented with the ZEISS Innovation Award. Can you briefly explain this project?

Prashant Desai: The ZEISS Kanchenjunga project enables diabetic patients to be screened for diabetic retinopathy (DR) at their existing point of care – in pathology labs during their routine visits for blood sugar tests. Health care technicians can quickly and easily administer fundus exams using the affordable ZEISS VISUSCOUT 100 handheld non-mydriatic fundus camera, and wirelessly transmit clinical images to reading centers for remote assessment by ophthalmologists. This process allows for early diagnosis – and henceforth, early treatment of DR to help prevent vision loss. 

 

What was the impetus for your research in this field?

Prashant Desai: Diabetic retinopathy, which develops in nearly all diabetics, is one of the leading causes of blindness; yet, routine eye exams are not part of standard practice for diabetes care in India. This could lead to devastating consequences for the 62 million diabetics in India and for millions more yet to be diagnosed in the wake of an escalating diabetes epidemic. The Kanchenjunga project, aptly named after the third highest mountain in the world where climbers stop short of reaching the summit, aims to address this potentially insuperable situation.

 

What are, from your point of view, the key innovation drivers for Medical Technology?

Prashant Desai: In my view, innovation drivers: address a problem by offering clear benefits that are affordable as well as sustainable.

Diabetic Retinopathy:

Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of Diabetes Mellitus (DM). It develops in nearly all diabetics and is a leading cause of new-onset blindness. DR is responsible for 4.8% of the 37 million cases of blindness throughout the world. A routine eye exam is not standard practice in diabetes care in India. However, diabetics routinely visit the pathology labs for blood sugar tests.

The data is captured using the VISUSCOUT 100 handheld fundus camera from ZEISS …

… and can then be evaluated elsewhere on a tablet or on a desktop computer.

Patient Information about Diabetic Retinopathy:

Early screening for Diabetic Retinopathy could help protect your vision

Learn more