Building the future.

Microscopy Solutions for Engineering Materials

Building the future.

Microscopy Solutions for Advancing Engineering Materials

Tomorrow's materials demand to be lighter, faster, stronger, smarter, and more durable. Whether it is in the applications of high-speed air or ground transportation, long lasting and economical construction or advanced space exploration technologies. If you understand the complex connections between processing, properties and the underlying structures that, collectively, influence how a material performs and why it might fail, this will allow you to design materials for engineering innovations. 

Tomorrow's materials demand to be lighter, faster, stronger, smarter, and more durable. Whether it is in the applications of high-speed air or ground transportation, long lasting and economical construction or advanced space exploration technologies. If you understand the complex connections between processing, properties and the underlying structures that, collectively, influence how a material performs and why it might fail, this will allow you to design materials for engineering innovations. 

Microscopy characterization techniques enable materials researchers to study features of interest such as:

  • grain structure and sizes
  • texture, phases and phase transitions
  • volume fractions, inclusions, impurity distributions
  • surface finish.

Explore how microscopy solutions can help you overcome some of today's most pressing research challenges.

Investigate metals and alloys.

Metals and alloys are ubiquitous. Researchers tailor their properties by controlling the crystallography, chemistry and processing to achieve superior corrosion resistance, high strength and fracture toughness, electrical conductivity or magnetic properties.

Light, X-ray and electron microscopes provide you with unique capabilities to solve both the routine characterization and advanced research problems on multiple length scales.

Analyze building materials.

Building materials – including cement, concrete, steel and wood – are created to produce greener, more efficient structures. Researchers and materials engineers aim to increase their self-cleaning or healing abilities, strength, and durability or to optimize their thermal insulating properties.

Advanced 2D and 3D non-destructive microscopy techniques enable you to focus on improving the durability, safety and performance of building materials.

Explore ceramics and coatings.

Ceramics are extraordinary: they are hard and chemically non-reactive, neither metallic nor organic, may be crystalline, glassy or both. Due to their excellent wear resistance, high temperature capabilities and unique electronic
properties, they are used in spark plugs, self-lubricating bearings, chemical sensors, artificial joints, and many more components.

Advanced electron and x-rays microscopy techniques enable you to get a better understanding of the complex mechanisms that give rise to the exceptional properties of ceramics at microstructural scales.

Study composite materials.

Imagine you could combine two materials and improve their properties resulting in composites that are specialized to be impact-resistant, lighter or resistant to electricity. You will have improved the properties of their base materials and gained remarkable weight savings together with relative stiffness and strength. Composites like these are applied in ground and air transportation, sporting goods and medical devices. 

As a materials scientists who develops new composites, you need to visualize and measure key features such as fiber-matrix interfaces, fiber orientations, ply variations and defects. Capitalize on novel light, electron and X-ray microscopy techniques enabling cutting-edge research.

Select your field of interest.

Learn more about microscopy solutions for engineering materials.

Metals and Alloys

Building Materials

Ceramics and Coatings

Composites