Microscopy Events

ZEISS at the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS) Annual Meeting

March 12 - 14, 2018 - Phoenix, AZ, USA, booth #407

We believe in the great power of materials to change our world. In this pursuit of understanding and technical progress, materials researchers need to characterize microstructure. We at ZEISS equip scientists and engineers to build the future.

Metals are a group of complex and versatile materials utilized in an incredible range of applications – from construction, to automotive, energy and consumer goods – each demanding different properties. Accurate measurements at various stages during the manufacturing process help understand how the influencing variables control microstructures, alter composition and introduce impurities.

ZEISS offers a leading-edge portfolio for the metals and steel industry. More than 160 years of experience in optics has laid the foundation for pioneering light, electron, x-ray and ion beam microscopes with superior integration of imaging and analytical capabilities to provide information beyond resolution.

Visit our booth, meet with our experts and learn more.

Advanced surface sensitive imaging of fractured aluminum part (ZEISS Sigma FE-SEM)

LabDCT: Direct visualization of 3D grain orientation through diffraction contrast tomography (ZEISS 520 Versa XRM)

Longitudinal section of a metal 3D printed by selective laser melting of AlSi10Mg (ZEISS Axio Imager, 100X)

  • Schduele
    Symposium Session
    Title of Abstract Speaker/Authors Date, Time, & Location
    Nanocomposites V: Structure-Property Relationships in Nanostructured Materials Deformation Behavior of Novel Co-sputtered Nanolaminate Metal/ Ceramic Composites

    Somya Singh1, C. Shashank Kaira, Hrishikesh Bale2, J. Kevin Baldwin, Nathan Mara, Nikhilesh Chawla1

    1Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, United States
    2Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Pleasanton, California, United States

    Monday, March 12, 2018
    8:40 AM
    Location: Phoenix Convention Center, Room 102C
     
    Characterization of Minerals, Metals, and Materials Integrated Imaging in Three Dimensions: The Sum is Greater than the Parts

    Ashwin J. Shahani1, Hrishikesh Bale2, Nicolas Gueninchault3, Arno Merkle, Erik M Lauridsen3

    1University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    2Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Pleasanton, California, United States
    3Xnovo Technology, Køge, Denmark

    Monday, March 12, 2018
    9:05 AM
    Location: Phoenix Convention Center, Room 122C
     
    Application of Solidification Fundamentals to Challenges in Metal Additive Manufacturing Tomography and 3D Grain Mapping for Additive Manufacturing Qualification

    Will Harris, Leah Lavery, Luke Hunter, Jeff Gelb

    Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Pleasanton, California, United States

    Tuesday, March 13, 2018
    10:20 AM
    Location: Phoenix Convention Center, Room 232B
    Non-equilibrium Features of Grain Boundaries Mapping of 3D Grain Boundary Characteristics by LabDCT

    Erik Lauridsen1, Nicolas Gueninchault1, Jun Sun1, Florian Bachmann1, Hrishikesh Bale2, Christian Holzner1, Leah Lavery2

    1Xnovo Technology, Køge, Denmark
    2Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Pleasanton, California, United States

    Monday, March 12, 2018
    5:30 PM
    Location: Phoenix Convention Center, Room 102C
     
    Advanced Characterization Techniques for Quantifying and Modeling Deformation Correlative Microscopy in Materials Science

    Will Harris, Tobias Volkenandt, Leah Lavery

    Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Pleasanton, California, United States

    Tuesday, March 13, 2018
    6:00 – 7:30 pm
    Location: Phoenix Convention Center, Poster Area
    Environmentally Assisted Cracking: Theory and Practice Effect of 3D Crystallographic Orientation and Microstructure on the Evolution of Corrosion in Aluminum Alloys

    Nikhilesh Chawla1, Tyler Stannard3, Hrishikesh Bale2, Nicolas Gueninchault3, Jeff Gelb, Arno Merkle, Erik Lauridsen3

    1Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, United States
    2Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Pleasanton, California, United States
    3Xnovo Technology, Køge, Denmark

    Thursday, March 15, 2018
    10:10 AM
    Location: Phoenix Convention Center, Room 102A
     
  • Abstracts
    Speaker Abstract

    Will Harris
    Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy

    Tomography and 3D Grain Mapping for Additive
    Manufacturing Qualification

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex anisotropic 3D structures. The reliability and performance of the produced parts relies heavily on the resultant microstructure from often-proprietary feedstock.
    Materials designed for high-stress applications can be quite sensitive to discrete, complex pore structure, therefore the need to investigate and understand the morphology in 3D at the appropriate pore scale to avoid premature failure. X-ray microscopy (XRM) for tomography using a laboratory source was used to characterize porosity in additive process control study for various steel input materials and Ti-6Al-4V built with Arcam SEBM. For additional process and material qualification, a new XRM commercial development for 3D grain mapping termed diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) will be discussed. An example of this capability was used to follow the sintering of copper particles through a series of time-lapsed DCT measurements. XRM can provide accurate 3D internal structural information critical to aid computational design of next-generation materials.

    Will Harris
    Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy

    Correlative Microscopy in Materials Science

    In characterizing the microstructure and evolution of a material, it may be necessary to capture features across a range of length scales.
    Unfortunately, no single instrument exists that can address this “multi-scale challenge” and, furthermore, that is capable of coupling studies of microstructure evolution with multi-scale resolution. For this reason, many researchers are turning toward correlative microscopy workflows, where instruments such as SEMs and XRMs can be used alongside in situ devices to map changes in microstructure, identifying smaller regions for targeted analysis with FIB-SEM.
    In this presentation, we will both introduce the motivations for correlative microscopy and discuss recent progress in the development of correlative characterization workflows. We will present the development of an open framework, in which multi-dimensional data may be used in an integrated manner, enabling hierarchical studies across length scales and facilitating collaborative routines amongst researchers at geographically disparate locations.

    Erik Lauridsen
    Xnovo Technology

    Mapping of 3D Grain Boundary Characteristics by
    LabDCT

    Laboratory diffraction contrast tomography (LabDCT) with a ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscope opens up new possibilities of non-destructive 3D and time resolved 4D studies of polycrystalline material using a laboratory X-ray source. In addition to absorption contrast and phase contrast tomography, the LabDCT imaging modality spatially resolves crystallographic orientation of individual grains. The unique LabDCT approach exclusively closes the gap to synchrotron 3D grain mapping techniques within laboratory research. Grain shapes and boundaries of metals, alloys or ceramics can be characterized fully in 3D. This novel non-destructive laboratory technique enables the observation and characterization of microstructural response to stimuli (stress, thermal, radiation) of one and the same sample over time. Morphological and orientation development of individual grains and their grain boundaries can be accessed and tracked. Examples in both 3D and 4D will demonstrate current capabilities of the LabDCT technique for grain boundary characterization and boundary dynamics.

    Somya Singh
    Arizona State University

    Deformation Behavior of Novel Co-sputtered Nanolaminate Metal/ Ceramic Composites

    Nanolaminate composite systems have been of scientific interest due to their enhanced properties as compared to their bulk counterparts. In this talk we discuss the structure-property relationships of Al-SiC co-sputtered monolayer and multilayer materials. Magnetron sputtering was used to synthesize samples having different atomic ratios of Al and SiC. These materials exhibited extremely high hardness and strength. Microstructural characterization was done through FIB cross-sectioning and TEM imaging to study the role of the nanostructure on deformation behavior. Nanoindentation, micropillar compression and beam bending tests were performed for studying the mechanical properties. These experiments were used to advance our understanding of the dependence of mechanical properties on the atomic ratio of different components, individual layer thicknesses and size of these samples.

    Nikhilesh Chawla
    Arizona State University

    Effect of 3D Crystallographic Orientation and Microstructure on the Evolution of Corrosion in Aluminum Alloys

    Aluminum alloys are frequently exposed to harsh environments in service. Several factors including the underlying microstructure, defects, and crystallographic orientations effect corrosion-related fracture of these alloys. Grain mapping techniques like EBSD are restricted to 2D surface imaging and can only be extended in three dimensions by serial sectioning of the sample. Laboratory-based diffraction contrast tomography is now possible on a commercially available X-ray microscope enabling a time dependent study of corrosion in aluminium alloys wherein samples can be imaged in 3D to understand the complex mechanisms of corrosion. We present results of LabDCT applied to peak-aged 7475 alloy which reveal the 3D microstructure. Absorption tomography data clearly shows the distribution of inclusions throughout the sample volume along with LabDCT results showing corresponding grain information. We also present the results of combining the two datasets, which enables quantification of the influences of grain orientation and inclusions on corrosion pit formation.

    Ashwin J. Shahani
    University of Michigan

    Integrated Imaging in Three Dimensions: The Sum is Greater than the Parts

    Recent developments in laboratory-based diffraction contrast tomography (LabDCT) have shown its capability to non-destructively map the 3D morphology and crystallographic orientation in the bulk of a polycrystalline sample.
    Using a combination of LabDCT and attenuation-based tomography, we present here the first experimental results from the imaging of a polycrystalline silicon sample and demonstrate the application of this integrated approach in obtaining crucial microstructural and grain related crystallographic information.