Joint workshop

Advances in Imaging & Analysis for the Oil & Gas Industry

SAVE THE DATE!
April 2, 2017 – noon to 4:30 p.m.

Workshop at University of Houston on pore scale imaging, modelling and experimentation

Pore scale imaging has developed over the last 20 years from a primarily academic technique used to visualize pore structures for fundamental research into an increasingly crucial industrial tool. It is now possible to routinely image, both in 2D and 3D, structures and processes occurring from the whole core down to the sub-nanometer scale (figure 1).

In this workshop, we will outline the state of the art technologies used in this analysis, including light, charged ion and X-ray microscopy, and some of the research challenges being tackled by these developments, including in situ experimentation (figure 2), multi-scale and correlative techniques, including groundbreaking ways of moving between scales using modern data science techniques.

Thought leaders in both academia and industry will showcase their most recent advances, including from:

  • University of Houston
  • NASA
  • BP
  • Weatherford Laboratories
  • Zeiss Microscopy
  • Ingrain
  • Australian National University
  • CGG
     

Free workshop with lunch hosted by the University of Houston and ZEISS

  • Pick-up at AAPG Registration area, transport to University of Houston
  • Lunch
  • Talks
  • Lab tour
  • Transport back to AAPG for opening reception

You have been placed on the waiting list. We will keep you updated regarding your status.

Figure 1: 3D rendering of FIB-SEM volume of organic hosted porosity from subsurface onshore US shale, imaged using 2.5 x 2.5 x 5nm voxels. Kerogen hosted porosity is shown in blue, kerogen in red, quartz in green and pyrite in yellow
Figure 1: 3D rendering of FIB-SEM volume of organic hosted porosity from subsurface onshore US shale, imaged using 2.5 x 2.5 x 5nm voxels. Kerogen hosted porosity is shown in blue, kerogen in red, quartz in green and pyrite in yellow
Figure 2: Wettability measurements on in situ multiphase fluid images using non-invasive 3D X-ray microscopy. The high porosity lithology sampled on the left shows an oil wet system, with brine bulging into oil and the oil residing in the corners of large pores and in small pores, whereas the low porosity lithology exhibits a qualitatively opposed wettability (water wet).
Figure 2: Wettability measurements on in situ multiphase fluid images using non-invasive 3D X-ray microscopy. The high porosity lithology sampled on the left shows an oil wet system, with brine bulging into oil and the oil residing in the corners of large pores and in small pores, whereas the low porosity lithology exhibits a qualitatively opposed wettability (water wet).
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