Microscopy Workshop

ZEISS Light and Electron Microscopy Lunch & Learn Workshop

January 23, 2018 - University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

ZEISS and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will be hosting a workshop detailing the principles of light and electron microscopy, including processes and techniques such as optical sectioning and correlative microscopy. Join us for this all-day Lunch and Learn event, and gain a better understanding of the principles behind capturing images on your microscope!

Lunch will be provided to all registrants.


Date: January 23, 2018
Time: 8 AM to 3 PM
Location: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Illinois Materials Research Laboratory
104 S. Goodwin Avenue
Room 280
Urbana, IL 61801

Agenda

Time Topic
8 AM - 9 AM Coffee and donuts
9 AM - 11 AM Seminar 1: Principles in Light Microscopy and Optical Sectioning
11 AM - 1 PM Lunch (provided to all registrants)
1 PM - 3 PM Seminar 2: Principles and Applications in Electron Microscopy and Correlative Techniques

Seminar 1

Principles in Light Microscopy and Optical Sectioning

An overview of the basic principles of light microscopy is offered. A detailed discussion of optical resolution (in the X, Y, and Z dimensions) is followed by a comprehensive overview of the most common optical sectioning (3D) modalities available with light microscopy. Point-scanning confocal, multi-photon, spinning disk confocal, and light sheet techniques are covered, and a deeper dive into various routes of superresolution (structured illumination, localization microscopy, image scanning microscopy) is also featured. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique is presented – as well as the relationship to applications involving live cell imaging, biomaterials, and tissue engineering.

Seminar 2

Principles and Applications in Electron Microscopy and Correlative Techniques

An overview of the basic principles of electron microscopy is presented, including classic imaging strategy, a review of energy and current effects on image acquisition, and strategies for compensating for difficult samples. Three-dimensional techniques at different length-scales and resolutions are covered, including focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), array tomography (AT) and serial block-face SEM, which allow for more accurate statistical analyses. Correlative microscopy techniques, including Shuttle and Find and ZEN Connect will be highlighted for a variety of microscopes as they relate to biological/biomaterials applications.

Register