Non-illuminated standard reticles

Non-illuminated reticles really come into their own when light conditions are good. They can also be used as rangefinders. Classic designs like the Reticle 4 use finely defined distances on the posts to provide practical information about the distance from the target.

Non-illuminated reticles are also extremely useful when shooting for sport. The Reticle 20 and the "Mildot" Reticle 43 both have extremely fine crosshairs, which cover very little of the target or the game at long range. If you hunt primarily in broad daylight or mild twilight, these classic, tried and tested reticles are a good option.

Reticle 4

non-illuminated

The "No. 4" is the most popular of the non-illuminated reticles. It can be used well on into the twilight.  Since this reticle is located exclusively in the 1st image plane on all current ZEISS riflescopes, the proportions remain the same in all magnification settings. This means you can also estimate distances. For this you simply need to know that the thin, central lines cover 1.5 cm at 100 m. This means that the space between the posts, at 70 cm at 100 m, corresponds to the approximate length of a deer at 100 m.

Reticle 6

non-illuminated

The non-illuminated reticle 6 lies in the second image plane, remains constant while changing magnification and is universally useable: The reticle is always clearly visible when taking quick shots at low magnification, yet stays very fine and only covers the target minimally at higher magnifications.

Reticle 20

non-illuminated

The equally fine Reticle 20 also sits in the 2nd image plane. It therefore offers particularly precise aiming for long-range shooting in daylight. With the 20, the posts are in the shape of arrows pointing to the fine lines in the middle. This makes it possible to aim with great precision at particularly small targets.

Z-Plex

non-illuminated

The equally fine Reticle 20 also sits in the 2nd image plane. It therefore offers particularly precise aiming for long-range shooting in daylight. With the 20, the posts are in the shape of arrows pointing to the fine lines in the middle. This makes it possible to aim with great precision at particularly small targets.

Reticle 43

non-illuminated

The very fine central crosshairs carry a number of points, which lie exactly 10 cm apart at  100 m at 12 x magnification. With its roots in English-speaking markets, it is also known as the"Mildot" reticle, as the angle between the points is equal to 1 milliradian = 10 cm / 100 m. This reticle also gives you the option, as with the Reticle 4, of estimating distances.

ZBR and ZMOA

non-illuminated

ZEISS ZBR and ZMOA ballistic reticles feature fixed MOA subtensions. The number followed by the reticle name (e.g ZBR-“1”) indicates the distance in MOA between the hashmarks [Distance “A” – e.g. “1” MOA]. The hashmarks on the horizontal and vertical crosshairs can be used for windage and elevation compensation, and for target ranging, when used with the optimum magnification setting stated in the charts.

ZMOA-2

non-illuminated

MOA-based smart reticle design. The hash marks represent two MOA spacing at a pre-established power/magnification settings. Very helpful for long-range shooting and hunting.

We use cookies on this site. Cookies are small text files that are stored on your computer by websites. Cookies are widely used and help to optimize the pages that you view. By using this site, you agree to their use. more