Microchips for Megatrends: Join Us and Shape the Future

Jobs at Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology

“We push the limits of what is possible”

What can no smartphone be without? That’s right, a microchip – the centerpiece of every electronically controlled system. A large proportion of all microchips are produced using ZEISS technologies. 

As a technology leader in the field of semiconductor manufacturing equipment, ZEISS enables the production of ever smaller, increasingly powerful, more energy-efficient and more economical microchips, and thus plays a pivotal role in the age of microelectronics. We are currently looking to fill more than 600 vacancies in the natural sciences, IT, engineering and production in our Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology division.

Working in Development

Developing tomorrow's innovations

When scientific findings pave the way toward groundbreaking innovations: our colleagues responsible for theory and practice in Research & Development at Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology are working closely on writing the next chapter in the story of digitalization. From natural and engineering sciences and from the algorithm to the software architecture, this is a place where high technology is developed – by people who look beyond the limits of what it technically feasible day in, day out.

Development

Martin sets new standards

Process developer

Martin's passion for science applies to surfaces – a precision research in the nanometer range. While at university, he contributed to 25 articles in international journals. But he wasn't content with merely seeing his research in writing: "It's fantastic to see how my scientific work is now impacting how groundbreaking products are manufactured." 

As a PhD physicist, Martin now works in a high-tech industrial environment, where scientific ideas enable the technologies of tomorrow. Martin is a process developer at the ZEISS Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology segment. As a surface specialist, he develops polishing processes for current & future lithography optics.

Development

Larissa Makes a Few Tweaks for the Final Picometers

Development engineer

Larissa just loves working as a development engineer. "I think what we've been able to achieve here is just so impressive," she says. "We're producing ever more precise optics so that we can ultimately create smaller and smaller semiconductor structures."

That's why there's such a pronounced need for sophisticated measuring machines, and Larissa and her international team are in charge of developing the highly complex mechatronic systems for them – she's also spent some time doing so outside Germany.

She and her team leverage their expertise and passion as they strive to keep pushing the limits of what is technically feasible. "You can only hope to be successful if you're working with people who share your passion and are proud to be a part of this development. That's certainly the case here."
So what makes her job so exciting? The fact that she can use her fascination with technology to create parts for complex machines, that she faces new and unprecedented challenges every day, and that "there's a much steeper learning curve here than there ever was at university."

Development

Simon enables tomorrow's technologies

Object architect for mirror assessment

Simon left academia to work in an industrial setting - and he doesn't regret his decision one bit: "I think it's fantastic to be able to follow my scientific passion and come up with solutions to complex problems – all while driving the success of groundbreaking products." 

As a functional manager, Simon works with his team to develop software and processes used to evaluate the new optical elements throughout the production process, thus navigating through it. Simon is an object architect for mirror assessment at the ZEISS Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology segment. 

"Our structure enables me to lead a team purely on the functional level. That means I can focus fully on ensuring technical progress."

Development

Karoline works at a place where progress is created

Head of Automation department for Production and Measuring Processes

Karoline works at a place where progress is created. This has been true since she wrote her doctoral thesis at CERN, as part of the research team that proved the existence of the Higgs particle. 

"After that I wanted to focus on advancing and innovating products," she says. And that's exactly what she did - by turning her attention to the automation of production and measuring processes for the world's most precise mirrors. She is the interface between colleagues working in Production and those working with highly complex measuring machines. 

She and her team make sure that the high-tech mirrors used in EUV lithography are manufactured in the first place, and can then be used to produce microchips. The resulting new chip generation raises the bar in digitalization. 

Karoline heads up the Automation department for Production and Measuring Processes at the ZEISS Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology segment. She also campaigns for greater diversity and has joined networks committed to helping more women assume leadership positions.

Development

Martin sets new standards

Process developer

Martin's passion for science applies to surfaces – a precision research in the nanometer range. While at university, he contributed to 25 articles in international journals. But he wasn't content with merely seeing his research in writing: "It's fantastic to see how my scientific work is now impacting how groundbreaking products are manufactured." 

As a PhD physicist, Martin now works in a high-tech industrial environment, where scientific ideas enable the technologies of tomorrow. Martin is a process developer at the ZEISS Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology segment. As a surface specialist, he develops polishing processes for current & future lithography optics.

Development

Larissa Makes a Few Tweaks for the Final Picometers

Development engineer

Larissa just loves working as a development engineer. "I think what we've been able to achieve here is just so impressive," she says. "We're producing ever more precise optics so that we can ultimately create smaller and smaller semiconductor structures."

That's why there's such a pronounced need for sophisticated measuring machines, and Larissa and her international team are in charge of developing the highly complex mechatronic systems for them – she's also spent some time doing so outside Germany.

She and her team leverage their expertise and passion as they strive to keep pushing the limits of what is technically feasible. "You can only hope to be successful if you're working with people who share your passion and are proud to be a part of this development. That's certainly the case here."
So what makes her job so exciting? The fact that she can use her fascination with technology to create parts for complex machines, that she faces new and unprecedented challenges every day, and that "there's a much steeper learning curve here than there ever was at university."

Development

Simon enables tomorrow's technologies

Object architect for mirror assessment

Simon left academia to work in an industrial setting - and he doesn't regret his decision one bit: "I think it's fantastic to be able to follow my scientific passion and come up with solutions to complex problems – all while driving the success of groundbreaking products." 

As a functional manager, Simon works with his team to develop software and processes used to evaluate the new optical elements throughout the production process, thus navigating through it. Simon is an object architect for mirror assessment at the ZEISS Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology segment. 

"Our structure enables me to lead a team purely on the functional level. That means I can focus fully on ensuring technical progress."

Development

Karoline works at a place where progress is created

Head of Automation department for Production and Measuring Processes

Karoline works at a place where progress is created. This has been true since she wrote her doctoral thesis at CERN, as part of the research team that proved the existence of the Higgs particle. 

"After that I wanted to focus on advancing and innovating products," she says. And that's exactly what she did - by turning her attention to the automation of production and measuring processes for the world's most precise mirrors. She is the interface between colleagues working in Production and those working with highly complex measuring machines. 

She and her team make sure that the high-tech mirrors used in EUV lithography are manufactured in the first place, and can then be used to produce microchips. The resulting new chip generation raises the bar in digitalization. 

Karoline heads up the Automation department for Production and Measuring Processes at the ZEISS Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology segment. She also campaigns for greater diversity and has joined networks committed to helping more women assume leadership positions.

Our Development employees will share insights into ...

Breaking new ground for tomorrow’s microchips

Increasingly smaller, higher-performing microchips that are more cost effective and energy efficient would be unthinkable without the ZEISS Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology (SMT) segment. That's because the key technology used to produce microchips is optical lithography, for which SMT is supplying the optical components and modules for exposure that will be integrated into the wafer scanner of strategic partner ASML.

With its EUV optics, SMT is helping drive Moore's Law and is setting the pace for digitalization – come and see for yourself!

Working in Production

Precision enables top quality

Sophisticated and demanding working processes are needed to manufacture highly precise optics in the nanometer range, and their related components. Only highly precise optics will enable chip manufacturers to produce the next generation of micro- and memory chips. These optics and their related components are created right here – where our colleagues give it their all and implement ideas with nanometer precision.

Production

Marek brings innovations to life

Marek manufactures frames for the lenses used to produce microchips. What does he think it comes down to? 

Getting stuck in and putting your ideas forward. That's how he helps make microchips even smaller, more powerful and more energy-efficient. Marek works in production at ZEISS. Measurement results that are 100% accurate give him a real sense of achievement every day.

Hear from our Production employees ...

Other vacancies at Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology

Semiconductor manufacturing technology is all about teamwork

From project management in development to the design of IT infrastructures, there are plenty of exciting challenges in the Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology segment. Meet our colleagues and be inspired – perhaps you'll share some of their ambitions!

Seeing beyond in microlithography

Winfried Kaiser is regarded a key figure in the development of lithography technologies. In 2020, Winfried Kaiser was honored with the Frits Zernike Award for Microlithography for his commitment to this field. The award was bestowed by the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) and is considered to be the highest honor in microlithography.

In the video, he tells us what fascinates and motivates him.


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