X-RAY IMAGING

Visualize Internal Structures of Life Science Specimens​

Non-destructive X-ray Imaging Solutions from Microns to Millimeters​1

  • Gain more insights from bone samples
  • Capture plant structure without sectioning
  • Revolutionize structural imaging of soft tissue
  • Streamline multimodal workflows

Understanding physiological structures is at the core of many research questions for life scientists. Electron microscopy offers structural information at the ultra-resolution level. However, you may be seeking larger volumes of structural information from your samples. Or perhaps you would like to streamline your synchrotron or electron microscopy workflow by quickly acquiring an overview 3D dataset to guide you to your regions of interest. ZEISS X-ray imaging systems provide high contrast, high resolution 3D imaging of your delicate biological samples including mineralized and soft tissues, organs and organoids, plant tissues and more. Study inside your specimen histologically, without destroying your sample with dissection, down to a cellular level.

Mouse tibia imaged using the ZEISS Xradia Context microCT
Mouse tibia imaged using the ZEISS Xradia Context microCT

Mouse tibia imaged using the ZEISS Xradia Context microCT system showing the bone microstructure, including osteocyte lacunae

Mouse tibia imaged using the ZEISS Xradia Context microCT system showing the bone microstructure, including osteocyte lacunae

Gain More Insights from Your Mineralized Tissue Specimens​

Multiscale Bone Acquisitions Down to the Nanoscale​

X-ray imaging is invaluable in skeletal research both for sample characterization and for bone morphometry measurements. Expanding bone explorations from mm to nm length scales provides exciting opportunities for addressing new research questions.

Soybean developing floral complex
Soybean developing floral complex Courtesy of Dr. Keith Duncan, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, USA​
Courtesy of Dr. Keith Duncan, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, USA​

Soybean developing floral complex showing the ovary with developing ovules surrounded by the anthers containing bright pollen grains. Imaged with ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscope.

Soybean developing floral complex showing the ovary with developing ovules surrounded by the anthers containing bright pollen grains. Imaged with ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscope. Courtesy of Dr. Keith Duncan, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, USA​

Capture Internal Plant Structure without Sectioning​

Cellular Level Insights with Full 3D Context​

Understanding plant organ systems can provide insights into the health and yield of the plant. Non-destructive X-ray imaging provides high resolution structural information from many different plant components without needing to cut the specimens and remove the 3D context.

Rat heart imaged using ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscope.
Rat heart imaged using ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscope. Sample courtesy of the University of Radboud, Netherlands
Sample courtesy of the University of Radboud, Netherlands

Rat heart imaged using ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscope.

Rat heart imaged using ZEISS Xradia Versa X-ray microscope. Sample courtesy of the University of Radboud, Netherlands

Revolutionize Your Imaging of Soft Tissue Structure​

Internal Structure Analysis without Complex Sample Preparation​

X-ray imaging allows straightforward structural exploration of soft tissues like 3D cultures, organs, tumors, biopsies and embryos. This complements the functional or specific localization information from fluorescence microscopy and bridges the resolution gap to the ultrastructural data generated using electron microscopy.​

2D slice from a 3D reconstruction of a sample prepared for serial blockface scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). The X-ray microscope image captured with the ZEIS Xradia Versa was used for subsequent sample trimming and targeted acquisition using volume EM.
2D slice from a 3D reconstruction of a sample prepared for serial blockface scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). The X-ray microscope image captured with the ZEIS Xradia Versa was used for subsequent sample trimming and targeted acquisition using volume EM. Courtesy of Alana Burrell@EM_STP, CRICK Institute, London.
Courtesy of Alana Burrell@EM_STP, CRICK Institute, London.

2D slice from a 3D reconstruction of a sample prepared for serial blockface scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). The X-ray microscope image captured with the ZEIS Xradia Versa was used for subsequent sample trimming and targeted acquisition using volume EM. 

2D slice from a 3D reconstruction of a sample prepared for serial blockface scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). The X-ray microscope image captured with the ZEIS Xradia Versa was used for subsequent sample trimming and targeted acquisition using volume EM. Courtesy of Alana Burrell@EM_STP, CRICK Institute, London.

Streamline Your Multimodal Imaging Workflows​

Screen Specimens for Quality and Identify Structures for Further Investigation

Generating high resolution, optimal datasets at the synchrotron or electron microscope requires specimens that are perfectly prepared. Non-destructive X-ray imaging is an easy way to generate a large, 3D specimen map which can be used to verify sample quality, explore internal structure and to guide your selection of a location for subsequent higher resolution acquisitions.

New to X-ray Imaging and Want to Learn More?​

Discover How X-ray Technology Can Further Your Life Science Research​

X-ray computed tomography describes the acquisition of 2D X-ray transmission images captured at multiple viewing angles and reconstructed to create a 3D representation of the specimen. The key benefit is that this is done without physically sectioning the specimen. ​

Sample courtesy of Massachusetts General Hospital.

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    Title Image: 

    Rat Heart: Courtesy of University of Radboud, Netherlands.
    Pig eye: Data courtesy of Prof Rachel Williams, Dr Brendan Geraghty, Dr Victoria Kearns, Valentin Pied and Dr Julia Behnsen, University of Liverpool, UK.
    Mouse bone: Sample from the collection of Daniel Wescott, University of Texas at San Marcos. Imagery and analysis performed using Dragonfly Pro Bone Analysis module.
    Mouse embryo: Sample courtesy of Massachusetts General Hospital.
    Zebrafish: Animation from Suniaga, S., Rolvien, T., vom Scheidt, A. et al. Increased mechanical loading through controlled swimming exercise induces bone formation and mineralization in adult zebrafish. Sci Rep 8, 3646 (2018).