ZEISS Xradia Ultra
Product

ZEISS Xradia Ultra

Nanoscale X-ray Imaging: Explore at the Speed of Science

Synchrotron X-ray nanotomography enables non-destructive 3D imaging at the nanoscale but you have to apply for very limited beamtime. What if you didn’t have to wait for synchrotron time anymore? Imagine if you had synchrotron capabilities in your own lab. With the ZEISS Xradia Ultra family, you have 3D non-destructive X-ray microscopes (XRM) at hand that deliver nano-scaled resolution with synchrotron-like quality. Choose between two models: both ZEISS Xradia 810 Ultra and ZEISS Xradia 800 Ultra are tailored to gain optimum image quality for your most frequently-used applications.

  • Non-destructive imaging in native environment​
  • Nanoscale 3D X-ray imaging  at a spatial resolution down to 50 nm and 16 nm voxel sizes
  • 3D and 4D in situ experiments
  • Quantification of nanostructures and using the data for modelling input
  • Exploring hard and soft materials 
Xradia Ultra 810 interior

Supercharge Your Research with Non-destructive Nanoscale Imaging​

  • Harness unique non-destructive imaging to observe nanoscale phenomena in their native environments in 3D. ​
  • Benefit from the only instrument that fills the gap between sub-micron resolution XRMs (such as ZEISS Xradia Versa) and higher resolution, but destructive 3D imaging e.g., FIB-SEMs.​
  • Use integrated in situ solutions to perform leading non-destructive 3D / 4D X-ray imaging in your laboratory, with a resolution down to 50 nm and a voxel size of 16 nm. ​
  • Accelerate your research by adding these unique capabilities to your analytical portfolio.
2D reconstructed slice of a pine needle in Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) mode (left).
2D reconstructed slice of a pine needle in absorption contrast (right).

Achieve Superior Contrast and Image Quality

  • Observe defects in 3D without destroying your sample or altering the data with slicing artifacts. ​
  • Reveal details with highest contrast and image quality using absorption and Zernike phase contrast. Combine data from both modes to reveal features that one single contrast could never have achieved. ​
  • Both Xradia 810 Ultra and Xradia 800 Ultra are geared towards optimum image quality for your most frequently-used applications. Which version is best for you depends on the material type for which you want optimal contrast, throughput and material penetration.​
  • Benefit from nanoscale X-ray imaging with synchrotron-like capabilities when using Xradia Ultra.

Caption: 2D reconstructed slice of a pine needle in Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) mode (left) and absorption contrast (right).

3D printed nanolattice structure, imaged in Zernike phase contrast before in situ compression experiments. Sample courtesy: R. Schweiger, KIT, DE (Sample width 30 µm).

Extend the Boundaries of Your Lab

  • Gain a new level of understanding with synchrotron-like capabilities. Remove barriers to access at synchrotrons facilities. Obtain equivalent nanoscale 3D insights on your schedule in your own lab. ​
  • Perform 4D and in situ studies never possible before with lab-based imaging. ​
  • Carry out in situ mechanical, thermal, electrochemical and environmental testing.​
  • Use correlative workflows and connect to other modalities (e.g., ZEISS Xradia Versa, ZEISS Crossbeam, analytics). Serve a broad range of imaging facility users with a streamlined user interface, including a dedicated Python API.

Caption: 3D printed nanolattice structure, imaged in Zernike phase contrast before in situ compression experiments. Sample courtesy: R. Schweiger, KIT, DE (Sample width 30 µm).

Technology

Resolve Nanoscale Features Using X-Rays in a Unique Set-up

Microscopists aiming to achieve 3D non-destructive, nanometer resolution to characterize their specimens comprehensively require optics that deliver:

  • 3D tomographic datasets at nano-scaled resolutions
  • enhanced image quality
  • focusing efficiency
  • best signal in limited experimental time
  • visualization of features in low-absorbing specimens.

The development of X-ray microscopes that could realize the techniques’ potential for high resolution imaging has historically been hindered by the difficulty of fabricating suitably robust and efficient X-ray optics. ZEISS Xradia Ultra employs advanced optics adapted from synchrotron research to enable you to fully leverage the non-destructive nature of X-rays and accomplish 3D imaging at the nanoscale in your laboratory.

Beam path illustration of ZEISS Xradia Ultra X-ray microscopes.​
Beam path illustration of ZEISS Xradia Ultra X-ray microscopes.​

Beam path illustration of ZEISS Xradia Ultra X-ray microscopes.​

Beam path illustration of ZEISS Xradia Ultra X-ray microscopes.​

Enjoy the Benefits of Synchrotron-adapted Architecture by Using:

  • reflective capillary condensers to match source properties and image at maximum flux density​
  • objectives with e.g., Fresnel zone plates where patented nanofabrication techniques provide the highest resolution and focusing efficiency optics for your research​
  • phase ring for Zernike phase contrast to visualize details in low-absorbing specimens​
  • high contrast and efficiency detectors based on scintillators, optically coupled to a CCD detector to give you the best signal in your limited experimental time​
  • and, as the specimen is rotated, collect images over a range of projection angles and then reconstruct into a 3D tomographic dataset.​
Applications

Applications

Find out how to image samples from research fields as different as materials, life or geo sciences and more.

Applications

Energy Materials​

Lithium ion battery cathode pore network and simulated diffusion through carbon binder domain. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra (Sample width 71 µm).
Lithium ion battery cathode pore network and simulated diffusion through carbon binder domain. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra (Sample width 71 µm).
Solid oxide fuel cell anode components segmented with voids seen in center electrolyte. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra.​
Solid oxide fuel cell anode components segmented with voids seen in center electrolyte. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra.​

Engineering Materials

Zinc particle undergoing oxidation at elevated temperature in situ using the Norcada Heating Stage. Imaged with ZEISS Xradia 810 Ultra, particle size 3 µm.
Zinc particle undergoing oxidation at elevated temperature in situ using the Norcada Heating Stage. Imaged with ZEISS Xradia 810 Ultra, particle size 3 µm.
{_In situ} compressive indentation failure in a SiC:BN composite fiber. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra & Ultra Load Stage (Sample width 65 µm).
In situ compressive indentation failure in a SiC:BN composite fiber. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra & Ultra Load Stage (Sample width 65 µm).

Polymer and Soft Materials

Elastomer at different stages of compression during an in situ load stage experiment. (left: uncompressed, center: compressed, right: decompressed). Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra.
Elastomer at different stages of compression during an in situ load stage experiment. (left: uncompressed, center: compressed, right: decompressed). Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra.
Polymer mask fibers with segmented NaCl particles to quantify filtering effectiveness. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra (Sample width 134 µm).
Polymer mask fibers with segmented NaCl particles to quantify filtering effectiveness. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra (Sample width 134 µm).

Life Sciences

Human hair virtual cross-sectional image with pores (black), and pigment melanosomes (white) visible within the interior. Exterior cuticle layers visible at left. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra in Zernike phase contrast.
Human hair virtual cross-sectional image with pores (black), and pigment melanosomes (white) visible within the interior. Exterior cuticle layers visible at left.  Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra in Zernike phase contrast.
Elastic lamellae (orange) and interlamellar regions visualized in unstained rat artery wall tissue. Imaged with Xradia 800 Ultra. Image courtesy: The University of Manchester, UK (Sample width 90 µm).
Elastic lamellae (orange) and interlamellar regions visualized in unstained rat artery wall tissue. Imaged with Xradia 800 Ultra. Image courtesy: The University of Manchester, UK (Sample width 90 µm).

Electronics

Copper microbump and interconnect visualization and defect inspection. Imaged with Xradia 800 Ultra (Sample width 52 µm).
Copper microbump and interconnect visualization and defect inspection. Imaged with Xradia 800 Ultra (Sample width 52 µm).
10 nm process microprocessor metal layer. Imaged with Xradia 800 Ultra.
10 nm process microprocessor metal layer. Imaged with Xradia 800 Ultra.

Geosciences

Segmentation of shale rock into component phases. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra.
Segmentation of shale rock into component phases. Imaged with Xradia 810 Ultra.
Micropillar of micritic carbonate microporosity, extracted using a multiscale workflow from petrographic thin section (Sample width 50 µm).
Micropillar of micritic carbonate microporosity, extracted using a multiscale workflow from petrographic thin section (Sample width 50 µm).

Accessories

Approximate imaging resolution for in situ testing, categorized by sample thickness and transparency.
Approximate imaging resolution for in situ testing, categorized by sample thickness and transparency.

Approximate imaging resolution for in situ testing, categorized by sample thickness and transparency. ZEISS Xradia Ultra fills in the gap between the nanometer resolution of SEM/TEM (restricted to surface imaging or extremely thin samples) and micrometer-scale tomography.

Approximate imaging resolution for in situ testing, categorized by sample thickness and transparency. ZEISS Xradia Ultra fills in the gap between the nanometer resolution of SEM/TEM (restricted to surface imaging or extremely thin samples) and micrometer-scale tomography.

In Situ Experiments at the Nanoscale

Bridge the In Situ Testing Gap

Materials research seeks to investigate properties that emerge under non-ambient conditions or external stimuli. When your goal is to observe microstructural changes and to link these to the material’s performance, in situ testing methods allow you to do exactly that. Equally important is to image those changes live and to investigate sample volumes that are representative for bulk properties.

Xradia Ultra is uniquely suited to in situ experiments and imaging at the nanoscale: it lets you image 3D structures non-destructively in the lab on sample sizes that represent bulk properties but have resolutions corresponding to the nanoscale phenomena.

Xradia Ultra load stage

Observe Your Specimens In Situ In Their Native Environment​

Understand how deformation events and failure relate to local nanoscale features. By complementing existing mechanical testing methods, you can gain insights into behavior across multiple length scales. ZEISS Xradia Ultra Load Stage enables in situ nanomechanical testing— compression, tension, indentation—in a unique way, using non-destructive 3D imaging. This lets you study the evolution of interior structures in 3D, under load, down to 50 nm resolution. ​

Norcada Heating and Biasing Stage for Xradia Ultra

Perform In Situ Heating Experiments​

Investigate nanoscale material changes such as degradation processes, thermal expansion, and phase transitions at elevated temperatures. The Norcada Heating Stage for ZEISS Xradia Ultra enables non-destructive nanoscale 3D imaging at elevated sample temperatures. MEMS heater technology provides sample heating in air up to 500 °C. Its flexible design allows for sample heating or sample voltage biasing with the same unit.​

Crossbeam LaserFIB
Crossbeam LaserFIB

Benefit from the LaserFIB for Fast and Easy Sample Preparation

Rapidly access your regions of interest (ROIs), even if they are deeply buried, or easily produce pillar-shaped samples for tests with ZEISS Xradia Ultra or at the synchrotron. Use the LaserFIB that combines a ZEISS Crossbeam FIB-SEM with an ultra-short pulsed femtosecond (fs) laser to enable correlative workflows across multiple length scales. Find your ROIs using, e.g., previously acquired 3D X-ray microscopy datasets and target them for further analysis using the Cut-to-ROI workflow. Use the fs laser to cut through millimeters of material and produce samples for analysis with Xradia Ultra. Then, leverage the FIB-SEM capabilities for nano- and micrometer-scale milling, tomography, imaging, and advanced analytics.

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, imaged on Xradia Ultra. Sample courtesy: Colorado School of Mines, US.
Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, imaged on Xradia Ultra. Sample courtesy: Colorado School of Mines, US.Sample courtesy: Colorado School of Mines, US.
Sample courtesy: Colorado School of Mines, US.

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, imaged on Xradia Ultra. 

Visualization and Analysis Software: ZEISS Recommends Dragonfly Pro

An advanced analysis and visualization software solution for your 3D data acquired by a variety of technologies including X-ray, FIB-SEM, and SEM.​ Available exclusively through ZEISS, ORS Dragonfly Pro offers an intuitive, complete, and customizable toolkit for visualization and analysis of large 3D grayscale data. Dragonfly Pro allows for navigation, annotation, creation of media files, including video production, of your 3D data. Perform image processing, segmentation, and object analysis to quantify your results.

Xradia Ultra Scout-and-Scan GUI Sand interface mosaic
Xradia Ultra Scout-and-Scan GUI Sand interface mosaic

Set. Load. Scout, Scan. Run. It's that simple. Find out how the graphical user interface guides you through the creation of your workflow effortlessly.​

Create Efficient Workflows with a User-Friendly Software

Boost your productivity with the innovative Scout-and-Scan™ Control System from ZEISS – streamline sample and scan setup. The workflow-based user interface guides you through the process of aligning the sample, scouting for regions of interest, and setting up 3D scans. Recipes allow you to set up multiple scans of the same sample to image various regions of interest, or to combine different imaging modes. The easy-to-use system is ideal for a central lab-type setting where users may have a wide variety of experience levels. Advanced users gain full control of the microscope for custom imaging tasks or integration into in situ experiments using an integrated Python API.​

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