garnet-kyanite gneiss, from Glenelg, Northwest Scotland
Microscopy Solutions for Natural Resources

Petrology and Mineralogy

Revolutionize your understanding of the geological world

Microscopy enables the exploration of the fine structural details, mineral composition, and textural relationships of geological specimens. This critical capability allows not only for the unraveling of geological histories, the identification of mineral phases, the evolution of our planet’s interior, and the interpretation of the dynamic forces that have shaped the Earth's crust over millions of years, but also paves the way for mineral and energy resource exploration, and environmental analysis.

Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology

Analyze and describe magmatic, volcanic, and metamorphic processes with advances in technology that allow you to quantify mineral distribution, automate large-scale analyses, describe structures in 3D, and integrate data together to facilitate a better understanding of the dynamic forces that shape the world around us. Determine the conditions under which the rocks were formed, identify, and characterize the mineral assemblages, textures and microstructures by analyzing the thin sections of your rocks. With the help of light, electron, and X-ray microscopy classify and interpret the rock types, and determine chemical composition to understand the processes involved in the formation and alteration of igneous and metamorphic rocks, enhancing your knowledge of Earth's geology and geodynamic processes.

Use ZEN Connect to intuitively build correlative projects that start with the data-rich, light microscopy environment from ZEISS Axioscan 7. Here additional phase and geochemical information from ZEISS Mineralogic becomes the next step in a petrological investigation. Sample shown is a granulite facies metagabbro from Scouriemore, North West Scotland.
Use ZEN Connect to intuitively build correlative projects that start with the data-rich, light microscopy environment from ZEISS Axioscan 7. Here additional phase and geochemical information from ZEISS Mineralogic becomes the next step in a petrological investigation. Sample shown is a granulite facies metagabbro from Scouriemore, North West Scotland.

Quantitative Petrology

Microscopic examination allows for the identification and measurement of mineral phases, their abundance, and their spatial relationships within the rock. This information is crucial for calculating modal mineralogy, mineral proportions, and volumetric fractions. Additionally, microscopy techniques like image analysis and automated mineralogy enable the quantification of mineral grain size, shape, and spatial distribution. ZEISS Mineralogic on a scanning electron microscope enables automated mineralogical mapping using quantitative geochemical analysis through energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Chemical information from EDS has been converted into mineral classifications that have been assigned a unique color. These measurements provide insights into processes such as crystallization, metamorphism, and deformation. Moreover, microscopic observation allows for the identification and characterization of microstructures and defects within minerals, which are essential for understanding the mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms of rocks.

Thin section, quantitative Ca EDS map of a high strain gneiss from the Glenelg region of Scotland. This sample charts the evolution of the rock to higher pressure through zoning of the mineral garnet, imaged at a pixel step size of 5 μm. The large particle viewer (LPV) interface can be seen with the element Ca selected in the periodic table and a concentration range defined on the threshold tool. A single click allows the export of the image that is seen on the screen with the legend associated.
Thin section, quantitative Ca EDS map of a high strain gneiss from the Glenelg region of Scotland. This sample charts the evolution of the rock to higher pressure through zoning of the mineral garnet, imaged at a pixel step size of 5 μm. The large particle viewer (LPV) interface can be seen with the element Ca selected in the periodic table and a concentration range defined on the threshold tool. A single click allows the export of the image that is seen on the screen with the legend associated.

Quantitative Petrology

Microscopic examination allows for the identification and measurement of mineral phases, their abundance, and their spatial relationships within the rock. This information is crucial for calculating modal mineralogy, mineral proportions, and volumetric fractions. Additionally, microscopy techniques like image analysis and automated mineralogy enable the quantification of mineral grain size, shape, and spatial distribution. ZEISS Mineralogic on a scanning electron microscope enables automated mineralogical mapping using quantitative geochemical analysis through energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Chemical information from EDS has been converted into mineral classifications that have been assigned a unique color. These measurements provide insights into processes such as crystallization, metamorphism, and deformation. Moreover, microscopic observation allows for the identification and characterization of microstructures and defects within minerals, which are essential for understanding the mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms of rocks.

Classification of shale heterogeneity. Green: fracture. Blue: low porosity. Red: high porosity. Yellow: pyrite.
Classification of shale heterogeneity. Green: fracture. Blue: low porosity. Red: high porosity. Yellow: pyrite.

Sedimentology

Perform detailed investigations of clastic, carbonate, and evaporitic rocks and understand weathering and erosion processes that shaped the geological features of Earth. Use automated grain size and shape measurements to understand the environmental conditions of formation. Employ correlative microscopy to blend mineralogy data from polarized light microscopes and automated mineralogy to provide textural knowledge. Determine stratigraphic sequences from microfossils and use detailed data on an organism’s structure to identify species and development levels to provide geological timescales. Furthermore, with microscopic techniques, such as thin-section analysis and scanning electron microscopy, you can examine sedimentary structures, such as cross-bedding and laminations, aiding in the interpretation of depositional environments and sedimentary facies.

Micromagnetics: the lowest energy domain state solution simulated for a magnetite test particle
Micromagnetics: the lowest energy domain state solution simulated for a magnetite test particle

Mineral Physics

Understand the critical physical and chemical properties of mineral samples by revealing micro-to-nano scale features in 2D and 3D. Advanced imaging and spectroscopic techniques coupled with microscopy enable the identification and characterization of different mineral phases, including their defects and impurities. This wealth of information greatly enhances our understanding of the Earth's interior, mineral magnetism, geodynamic processes, and the behavior of minerals under extreme conditions, contributing to advancements in mineral physics and related scientific disciplines.

Mineralogical Analysis for Reservoir Engineering

With its ability to provide high-resolution imaging and detailed characterization of mineral phases, textures, and distributions, microscopy has emerged as an indispensable tool for unraveling the complex geological complexities of reservoir rocks. ZEISS analytical techniques not only aid in identifying mineral compositions but also enable engineers and geologists to gain insights into the reservoir's porosity, permeability, and overall petrophysical properties. By bridging the gap between theory and reality, ZEISS microscopy empowers reservoir professionals with the knowledge needed to optimize resource extraction, enhance production strategies, and make informed decisions that drive the efficient and sustainable management of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Now you can achieve a full chemical description of the reservoir rock as well as a map of each individual mineral and a range of grain-by-grain information, including grain size distributions, textural, and lithological granular classification, and morphological measurements. Grains, including organics, may be viewed independently, or organized and sorted by measured physical parameters.

Downloads

  • ZEISS Microscopy Solutions for Geoscience

    Understanding the fundamental processes that shape the universe expressed at the smallest of scales

    File size: 15 MB
  • ZEISS Microscopy Solutions for Oil & Gas

    Understanding reservoir behavior with pore scale analysis

    File size: 7 MB
  • Improving the recovery of your resources

    ZEISS Microscopy Solutions for Mining

    File size: 19 MB
  • ZEISS Mineralogic

    3D Automated Quantitative Mineralogy

    File size: 2 MB
  • ZEISS Mineralogic 2D

    Flexible, quantitative automated mineralogy for geoscience research

    File size: 1 MB
  • ZEISS Mineralogic 3D

    The next dimension in automated mineralogy

    File size: 1 MB

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